Heightism – An Observers Tale

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“Psychologist Catherine Cottrell at the University of Florida and her colleague Steven Neuberg at Arizona State University, argue that human prejudice evolved as a function of group living. Joining together in groups allowed humans to gain access to resources necessary for survival including food, water, and shelter. Groups also offered numerous advantages, such as making it easier to find a mate, care for children, and receive protection from others. However, group living also made us more wary of outsiders who could potentially harm the group by spreading disease, killing or hurting individuals, or stealing precious resources. To protect ourselves, we developed ways of identifying who belongs to our group and who doesn’t. Over time, this process of quickly evaluating others might have become so streamlined that it became unconscious.”

It takes less than a second for the average woman to decide whether she is attracted to another or not.
Self esteem and confidence can only get you so far, it cannot change how individuals that have limited themselves to responding in certain ways to certain people.
It’s their way of feeling socially and personally superior. It’s the source of their power. To make fun of that which is different. It is what mankind has always done. We form groups based on similarities. It’s an expression of free will and preference, only as long as it does not harm anyone physically, mentally or emotionally. Personally, I have always enjoyed being able to look a romantic partner in the eye. As a 5ft2in tall female, that can attract unwanted attention. Ironically, it can be perceived as an open invitation at times to taller men. A challenge to prove their superiority. More often than not, these failed attempts have been more socially painful for them than my partner at the time. However, I’m very much for equality. I paid my way through University, working full time, without relying on financial support. My swiss heritage somewhat gave me an edge to promote equal standards even if it cost me a job…or two…or three. Not backing down can be a disadvantage, especially when you’re facing an army of people that think that the social system is working just fine. Or that the jobcentre is trying to make everyone middle class. There will always be those that oppose your perspective. In a institutionally corrupt world, even more so. The meak shall inherit the earth… Doesn’t mean it’ll be an easy process. Everything happens for a reason. At times, its just hard to recognize it. Height discrimination is remnant of a strength versus intelligence battle. Socially permitted bullying does not make in any way justified. To be different means that you are yourself. There are people out there are will lobe that which others view as imperfections. And that’s the one thing you can count on. Until then, perseverance is the only tactic that can allow an individual to suffer discrimination and survive. If you have survived, then you have outlasted that which tormented you without becoming the tormentor.

From a historical perspective, Alexander, The Great, for instance, was in truth 5ft3in tall. Nelson was in actuality shorter than Napoleon himself. In essence, height does not determine personality. However, it is a predominant factor in combat as well as reproduction. It is often depict that larger animals utilize smaller species as prey. It’s an easy capture without much risk. Similarly, it can soothe the ego complex to gain a females affection by outbidding other prospective mates. In any case, the results is often the same. A struggle for power ensues, which will leave one of them licking their wounds. Although I’ve witnessed countless fights, in which the taller male opposes the shorter male in superior numbers, I have only  been witness to few tall men in a fair fight. As a professional, I aim to redirect the need for violent confrontation. As a woman, I am acutely aware that the propagator will most likely search for another target elsewhere. That’s where you come in… Don’t let yourself become a target.

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“There’s just something appealing about tall men. Napoleon aside, tall men are more likely to win the popular contest in presidential votes and to be re-elected once in office (Stulp, 2013).  Their greater leadership potential may have something to do with the fact that tall men have higher self-esteem (whether or not deserved), are happier, and less likely to feel jealous toward other men.  When it comes to romantic partners, men and women tend to sort themselves out so that they form pairs of similar height. However, among married couples, women are more likely to be shorter than their husbands, if only by a few inches. In an intriguing 2013 study, Dutch psychologists Gert Stulp, Abraham Buunk, and Thomas Pollet followed up on some of their earlier work on male height to find out more about what leads women to prefer those lanky guys. They were also curious to learn how and why people are satisfied with their own height.”

There are obviously some social biases here, however, height does not equal survival capability, it is merely a factor. Intelligence is not defined by stature. In fact, intelligence is a more influential factor than height. Strength can only so get you so far.

“In a paper that will be published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Eva Telzer of UCLA and three other researchers report that they’ve performed these amygdala studies–which had previously been done on adults–on children. And they found something interesting: the racial sensitivity of the amygdala doesn’t kick in until around age 14. What’s more: once it kicks in, it doesn’t kick in equally for everybody. The more racially diverse your peer group, the less strong the amygdala effect. At really high levels of diversity, the effect disappeared entirely. The authors of the study write that ”these findings suggest that neural biases to race are not innate and that race is a social construction, learned over time.”

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3 thoughts on “Heightism – An Observers Tale

  1. Pingback: Heightism Broadcast –  Part I & Part II | Anita B. Sulser PhD

  2. Generally I do not learn article on blogs, but I wish to say that this write-up very pressured me to
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    Thanks, very great post.

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